We Are The Pilgrims

The name's Chad. I post HM Armed Forces, Military, and personal stuff sometimes. Plan to go to university and then join the military. If you wanna talk, my ask is always open.
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John Zeleznik

John Zeleznik

Tagged: #art

IMPORTANT, PLEASE READ - Sign the petition to stop the closure of the Royal Artillery Museum, Woolwich, London (Please reblog if you can too)

fuckyesbritishhistory:

http://epetitions.direct.gov.uk/petitions/64840

"The Museum has been open in Woolwich for almost two centuries.

To close this wonderful and historic place forever, and to exile its matchless Collections to inaccessible obscurity, would be a local and national travesty.”

The petition is in early days, we could really use your help!

Tagged: #Please sign

sdkfz142:

Polish Amphibian Attack Range
Soldiers from the Land Task Force of Operation REASSURANCE and Polish soldiers from 6th Airborne Brigade practice a peel right during a range simulating the response to an amphibian attack in Eastern Europe on August 20, 2014.

ultrafacts:

Source If you want more facts, follow Ultrafacts

That video was fucked up, good to hear

ultrafacts:

Source If you want more facts, follow Ultrafacts

That video was fucked up, good to hear

bag-of-dirt:

A French woman tends to the grave of a 23-year-old Canadian soldier who as buried earlier that day; Bombardier Everitt Ivan Hill of the 2nd Anti-Tank Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division, Royal Regiment of Canadian Artillery, killed during the Battle for Caen. Under his name and date of burial is written ”The French Will Never Forget the Canadians.” Beneath that inscription, on a separate piece of paper, is written in French:

"Rest in peace under the beautiful French sky,
Son of Canada and glorious martyr. 
You have given your life for our deliverance — 
May your name be forever blessed in Heaven.”

Hill, originally from Little Britain, Ontario, enlisted with the Royal Canadian Artillery on 24 March 1941 and landed in Normandy on D-Day. He was later reburied at Bretteville-sur-Laize Canadian War Cemetery near Cintheaux; one of approximately 50,539 Allied casualties in the Battle for Caen. Approximately 226,386 Allied soldiers and between 400,000 to 450,000 Axis soldiers would be killed in the Battle of Normandy. Caen, Calvados, Lower Normandy, France. 18 July 1944. Image taken by Canadian Army Lt. Ken Bell.

bag-of-dirt:

A French woman tends to the grave of a 23-year-old Canadian soldier who as buried earlier that day; Bombardier Everitt Ivan Hill of the 2nd Anti-Tank Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division, Royal Regiment of Canadian Artillery, killed during the Battle for Caen. Under his name and date of burial is written ”The French Will Never Forget the Canadians.” Beneath that inscription, on a separate piece of paper, is written in French:

"Rest in peace under the beautiful French sky,

Son of Canada and glorious martyr.

You have given your life for our deliverance —

May your name be forever blessed in Heaven.”

Hill, originally from Little Britain, Ontario, enlisted with the Royal Canadian Artillery on 24 March 1941 and landed in Normandy on D-Day. He was later reburied at Bretteville-sur-Laize Canadian War Cemetery near Cintheaux; one of approximately 50,539 Allied casualties in the Battle for Caen. Approximately 226,386 Allied soldiers and between 400,000 to 450,000 Axis soldiers would be killed in the Battle of Normandy. Caen, Calvados, Lower Normandy, France. 18 July 1944. Image taken by Canadian Army Lt. Ken Bell.

georgy-konstantinovich-zhukov:

"Mrs. Mary Couchman, a 24-year-old warden of a small Kentish Village, shields three little children, among them her son, as bombs fall during an air attack on October 18, 1940. The three children were playing in the street when the siren suddenly sounded. Bombs began to fall as she ran to them and gathered the three in her arms, protecting them with her body. Complimented on her bravery, she said, ‘Oh, it was nothing. Someone had look after the children.’"
(AP)

georgy-konstantinovich-zhukov:

"Mrs. Mary Couchman, a 24-year-old warden of a small Kentish Village, shields three little children, among them her son, as bombs fall during an air attack on October 18, 1940. The three children were playing in the street when the siren suddenly sounded. Bombs began to fall as she ran to them and gathered the three in her arms, protecting them with her body. Complimented on her bravery, she said, ‘Oh, it was nothing. Someone had look after the children.’"

(AP)

Tagged: #Badass